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David Lee King

Random Thought #2



Another thought, probably originating from listening to Abram:

Our next big set of customers are kids and teens right now. I could even stretch that out a bit to include 20-somethings. Are we really marketing to them?

Right now, most public library websites have a page or so devoted to kids, and the same for teens. Then we toss in the 20-something with his dad, his older brother, and his grandma – all run-of-the-mill adults.

Look at 10 library websites, then tell me… are they marketed to young adults, kids, or teens? No (well ok – don’t look at aadl.org – anything else is up for grabs, though).

And yet – we all talk about getting more teens into the library. And we should be talking about keeping them when they become parents in the next ten years.

So – maybe our websites (for starters) should be a bit more hip? Interactive? Fun? Attractive? etc….

Comments on this entry are closed.

  • http://tinfoilraccoon.com rochelle

    Hi Dave–I’ve highlighted this issues before, mostly in terms of how it’s just a good investement to make teens feel some ownership in their libraries. It’s just shortsighted to ignore the next generation of taxpayers! I wrote about it in a blog post about a teen gaming workshop at my library.

    “Traditionally, it’s been hard to court and keep teens interested in the library. After story hour, there’s not much in the way of programming (or as Czarnecki discovered, compelling programming) for the young adult set. But, teens are the next wave of voters and tax payers. As they enter adult life after having been out of touch with the library for so long, it makes sense that they wouldn’t be huge supporters of library service. Putting on this “different face,” and making the library a meaningful destination to this age group shouldn’t be seen as a luxury. It should be seen as a wise investment that will pay out dividends far into the future.”

  • http://tinfoilraccoon.com/ rochelle

    Hi Dave–I’ve highlighted this issues before, mostly in terms of how it’s just a good investement to make teens feel some ownership in their libraries. It’s just shortsighted to ignore the next generation of taxpayers! I wrote about it in a blog post about a teen gaming workshop at my library.

    “Traditionally, it’s been hard to court and keep teens interested in the library. After story hour, there’s not much in the way of programming (or as Czarnecki discovered, compelling programming) for the young adult set. But, teens are the next wave of voters and tax payers. As they enter adult life after having been out of touch with the library for so long, it makes sense that they wouldn’t be huge supporters of library service. Putting on this “different face,” and making the library a meaningful destination to this age group shouldn’t be seen as a luxury. It should be seen as a wise investment that will pay out dividends far into the future.”

  • http://www.blogger.com/profile/9125825 Stephanie Librarian

    Look at 10 library websites, then tell me… are they marketed to young adults, kids, or teens? No

    Hi David. I think the problem is the general idea that one library site design and interface should be able to target all age groups. Instead of trying to make a library’s general web site hip enough to speak to teens and interactive enough for children, libraries should recognize the different needs of these age groups and develop separate web sections for teens and children. And I’m talking about more than one page. One page of skimpy resources does not cut it 

    I personally am a teen services advocate, and so I highly support the development of teen services web sites for libraries. Many libraries currently have teen advisory boards that can help come up with ideas for the elements of a teen library web site. Low budget libraries might enlist a teen to design a young adult web site. Larger libraries that can afford professional design services should look for other ways to involve teens in the web site (discussion boards, book reviews).

  • http://www.conciant.com/ david law

    This concept has been forwarded by many people,however trying one thing can make a change”who knows”.

  • http://www.conciant.com david law

    This concept has been forwarded by many people,however trying one thing can make a change”who knows”.

  • http://sdating.net/ Alisya

    I suspect that’s thereason general public want to read blog….Internet visitors generally create blogs to declare themselves or their secret views. Blog grant them same matter on the monitor screen what they specifically needed,so as the above stuffs declared it.

  • http://sdating.net Alisya

    I suspect that’s thereason general public want to read blog….Internet visitors generally create blogs to declare themselves or their secret views. Blog grant them same matter on the monitor screen what they specifically needed,so as the above stuffs declared it.

  • http://jointadvance.blogspot.com/ Joint Advance

    Yeah with changing one thing it can be completely different.

  • http://jointadvance.blogspot.com/ Joint Advance

    Yeah with changing one thing it can be completely different.

  • http://www.blogger.com/profile/9125825 Stephanie Librarian

    Look at 10 library websites, then tell me… are they marketed to young adults, kids, or teens? No

    Hi David. I think the problem is the general idea that one library site design and interface should be able to target all age groups. Instead of trying to make a library's general web site hip enough to speak to teens and interactive enough for children, libraries should recognize the different needs of these age groups and develop separate web sections for teens and children. And I’m talking about more than one page. One page of skimpy resources does not cut it 

    I personally am a teen services advocate, and so I highly support the development of teen services web sites for libraries. Many libraries currently have teen advisory boards that can help come up with ideas for the elements of a teen library web site. Low budget libraries might enlist a teen to design a young adult web site. Larger libraries that can afford professional design services should look for other ways to involve teens in the web site (discussion boards, book reviews).