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David Lee King

Integrating Video into Library Websites



Hopefully the first of many posts on video! We have created an Emotional Health article for our library website. The article includes quick facts on stress and tips on getting organized, all found in one of our library databases. And, we also included a link to my last videocast about my messy desk. Why? It fits the article and it lends the article a bit of humor, too.

So that’s a start, anyway. What else can one do with video on a library website?

  1. Use it as support info (that’s what we did with my video)
  2. Post downloadable versions of library events, seminars, author talks
  3. Short snippets of library events for use on future event descriptions
  4. Videocast of bibliographic instruction, downloadable when a student needs it
  5. Tours of the library
  6. Showing what a meeting room looks like
  7. Directions to the library! Visual can’t hurt here…
  8. Oral histories – libraries are big on audio version of oral histories… why not capture them on video, too?
  9. From our Children’s website RFQ – short video tours of area attractions, online storytellers, kids showing off their cool collectables
  10. Something completely original… one idea: a video version of “what’s new to read” at the library

Am I leaving anything out? Let me know!

vlog, videocast, library2.0, web2.0, videoblog, podcast

Comments on this entry are closed.

  • http://www.blogger.com/profile/4667076 Sean Cordes

    Excellent list Dave. Two other options I might consider is using video to assess knowledge of libraray service areas and facilities by having students identify the points in the library and then add a recorded response using the iPod.

    Also, tour groups could have small keepsakes video snips made live during tours, and digitzed and uploaded. This could include info abnout the class tour and some library promo info!

    The class or group could then download the clip later for review and it might even be incorporated to foster information literacy in the classroom, “Based on the clip, where do we get indexes in the library?”

    I think both of these might be worth looking into. I am really looking to ways to tie the audience into the mix!

    Sean Cordes, Instructional Technology Librarian, Iowa State University

  • http://www.blogger.com/profile/4667076 Sean Cordes

    Excellent list Dave. Two other options I might consider is using video to assess knowledge of libraray service areas and facilities by having students identify the points in the library and then add a recorded response using the iPod.

    Also, tour groups could have small keepsakes video snips made live during tours, and digitzed and uploaded. This could include info abnout the class tour and some library promo info!

    The class or group could then download the clip later for review and it might even be incorporated to foster information literacy in the classroom, “Based on the clip, where do we get indexes in the library?”

    I think both of these might be worth looking into. I am really looking to ways to tie the audience into the mix!

    Sean Cordes, Instructional Technology Librarian, Iowa State University

  • http://www.blogger.com/profile/4667076 Sean Cordes

    Excellent list Dave. Two other options I might consider is using video to assess knowledge of libraray service areas and facilities by having students identify the points in the library and then add a recorded response using the iPod.

    Also, tour groups could have small keepsakes video snips made live during tours, and digitzed and uploaded. This could include info abnout the class tour and some library promo info!

    The class or group could then download the clip later for review and it might even be incorporated to foster information literacy in the classroom, “Based on the clip, where do we get indexes in the library?”

    I think both of these might be worth looking into. I am really looking to ways to tie the audience into the mix!

    Sean Cordes, Instructional Technology Librarian, Iowa State University

  • Anonymous

    Dave,

    Libraries might want to do live streaming of library events and programs, so people who can’t make it physically to the event can view — and even participate, if there is an option for asking questions or making comments via chat or email. I produced an event like this several years ago for the California Center for the Book — we did a five-site videoconference with Michael Chabon, and several other libraries streamed it as a live event through their websites. Several of them used it as an opportunity to get some good local news coverage.

    Dan Theobald

  • Anonymous

    Dave,

    Libraries might want to do live streaming of library events and programs, so people who can’t make it physically to the event can view — and even participate, if there is an option for asking questions or making comments via chat or email. I produced an event like this several years ago for the California Center for the Book — we did a five-site videoconference with Michael Chabon, and several other libraries streamed it as a live event through their websites. Several of them used it as an opportunity to get some good local news coverage.

    Dan Theobald

  • Anonymous

    Dave,
    Some campus libraries promote books written by their faculty — a great way to gain faculty advocacy of the library. Why not showcase campus faculty authors, illustrators, inventors, and the like via podcast promotions of professor products and projects.

    Nice blog topic.
    - Jackie Siminitus
    AT&T Library Advocate
    California

  • Anonymous

    Dave,
    Some campus libraries promote books written by their faculty — a great way to gain faculty advocacy of the library. Why not showcase campus faculty authors, illustrators, inventors, and the like via podcast promotions of professor products and projects.

    Nice blog topic.
    - Jackie Siminitus
    AT&T Library Advocate
    California

  • http://www.blogger.com/profile/4667076 Sean Cordes

    Excellent list Dave. Two other options I might consider is using video to assess knowledge of libraray service areas and facilities by having students identify the points in the library and then add a recorded response using the iPod.

    Also, tour groups could have small keepsakes video snips made live during tours, and digitzed and uploaded. This could include info abnout the class tour and some library promo info!

    The class or group could then download the clip later for review and it might even be incorporated to foster information literacy in the classroom, “Based on the clip, where do we get indexes in the library?”

    I think both of these might be worth looking into. I am really looking to ways to tie the audience into the mix!

    Sean Cordes, Instructional Technology Librarian, Iowa State University