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David Lee King

Web 2.0 Class – Reflections after-the-fact



I taught my first Web 2.0 class a few days ago, and I think it went well! There were 9 attendees, and millions of questions… And the questions/comments were great – they were, for the most part, things I hadn’t thought of. Here are some of them:

  • Are Web 2.0 tools authoritative? Especially in regards to blogs and Wikipedia. So we discussed concepts like currency of web information, accuracy (mentioning the Wikipedia vs Britannica study), and how a “regular joe” blog writer could actually post accurate, authoritative information.
  • Copyright! Is all this content under copyright, how does a library use this type of copyrighted material, etc. So we discussed that, and the concept of Creative Commons licenses.
  • Accuracy again – Wikipedia came up more than once. Librarians weren’t comfortable with the concept of Wikipedia – allowing anyone to change articles. I didn’t think of this until class was over, but will use it next time – if something is inaccurate on Wikipedia for 1 year… is that bad… compared with an inaccuracy in a printed version of Britannica – that inaccuracy exists forever (until the library gets rid of their copy). I’d say Wikipedia wins out.
  • Tagging – this concept threw pretty much the whole class for a loop. First – why would someone want to tag an item on the web? Second – how in the world can a non-authoritative, non-controlled vocabulary tag be useful in a search?We probably talked for 20 minutes about tagging! Again, something I thought of after the fact – I think next class, I’ll hold up an apple, and have the class “tag” it for me. That should provide a good example of real world tagging in action.
  • Flickr – why would anyone in their right minds WANT to put images on the web?
  • Privacy in general – we had a good discussion about how the younger generation isn’t as interested in privacy issues, and is more interested in sharing and networking.
  • Time – some thought these new tools were great, but wondered about the time involved to create content using them. So we discussed how to meet library goals in the digital age, that some goals might need to change, and that if these types of tools, that in essense extend a library’s reach, seem important… then library job descriptions and functions might need to be revised to meet those new goals. Honestly – you can’t keep up a blog if you don’t have time to post, don’t have anything to post, and don’t really care to post in the first place.

  I’ll be doing another big class (the first one went for 3 hours) in May, and I’ll be doing an extremely shortened version (1 hour tops) next Friday at my library’s staff day. I’ll let everyone know how they both go.

Library 2.0, Web 2.0

Comments on this entry are closed.

  • http://www.searchlounge.org Chris Fillius

    Interesting responses.

    I want librarians to embrace tagging so that future tagging systems will integrate a controlled vocabulary and/or an ontology (a ‘tagsology’) behind the scenes.

    Combining the freedom of tags with some gentle oversight is where I think we’re heading.

  • http://www.goblin-cartoons.com/library/ joshua m. neff

    One of my coworkers *did* attend that class. She said it was good (and you were a good instructor). She also came back all fired up about experimenting with our library website (a very good thing) with some cool ideas (the SJCPL wiki is freakin’ brilliant!).

    As for tagging, here’s a thing: patrons frequently come into my library asking for “relationship” books or “self help” books, used to bookstore sections. There are very good reasons why those aren’t Dewey categories, but with tagging, library items could be dual classified, in Dewey and in folksonomy classifications. Couldn’t that make it easier for patrons to find things like “self help” books in a library catalog?

  • http://www.goblin-cartoons.com/library/ joshua m. neff

    One of my coworkers *did* attend that class. She said it was good (and you were a good instructor). She also came back all fired up about experimenting with our library website (a very good thing) with some cool ideas (the SJCPL wiki is freakin’ brilliant!).

    As for tagging, here’s a thing: patrons frequently come into my library asking for “relationship” books or “self help” books, used to bookstore sections. There are very good reasons why those aren’t Dewey categories, but with tagging, library items could be dual classified, in Dewey and in folksonomy classifications. Couldn’t that make it easier for patrons to find things like “self help” books in a library catalog?

  • http://libtechbytes.blogspot.com/ Helene Blowers

    Wow – you covered a whole lot of ground with that workshop. I’ve found with our staff that so much of this stuff is still so new to them, that I’ve having to stretch our my Talk Tech series over the course of a year. So far we’ve done RSS feeds and blogging (at 1.5 hours each) and I know that this is just the tip on iceberg. There’s so much else to explore. Good luck on the next workshop.

  • http://libtechbytes.blogspot.com Helene Blowers

    Wow – you covered a whole lot of ground with that workshop. I’ve found with our staff that so much of this stuff is still so new to them, that I’ve having to stretch our my Talk Tech series over the course of a year. So far we’ve done RSS feeds and blogging (at 1.5 hours each) and I know that this is just the tip on iceberg. There’s so much else to explore. Good luck on the next workshop.

  • http://library.boisestate.edu/skills/ Memo Cordova

    I’ve done a couple of presentations on web 2.0 for my staff as well (we’re an academic library), and privacy issues were tops, followed by the how’s on blogs and news readers. Now I’m focusing on showing and discussing news readers and RSS, how to set them up, and will eventually cover other online tools like wikis, bookmarking services, and the rest. And the discussions rocked. Thanks for sharing!

  • http://library.boisestate.edu/skills/ Memo Cordova

    I’ve done a couple of presentations on web 2.0 for my staff as well (we’re an academic library), and privacy issues were tops, followed by the how’s on blogs and news readers. Now I’m focusing on showing and discussing news readers and RSS, how to set them up, and will eventually cover other online tools like wikis, bookmarking services, and the rest. And the discussions rocked. Thanks for sharing!

  • http://www.walkingpaper.org/ aaron

    great thought about presenting the class with an apple to “tag.” i might steal that idea!

    THANKS

  • http://www.walkingpaper.org aaron

    great thought about presenting the class with an apple to “tag.” i might steal that idea!

    THANKS

  • http://www.cep.unep.org/portal_memberdata/portraits/wendy temnotak
  • http://www.cep.unep.org/portal_memberdata/portraits/wendy temnotak
  • http://kragerk.edu.eu.org/girls-of-hawaiian-tropic.html peto4ok

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  • http://kragerk.edu.eu.org/girls-of-hawaiian-tropic.html peto4ok

    sspkts26 So interesting site, thanks!
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  • http://www.searchlounge.org/ Chris Fillius

    Interesting responses.

    I want librarians to embrace tagging so that future tagging systems will integrate a controlled vocabulary and/or an ontology (a 'tagsology') behind the scenes.

    Combining the freedom of tags with some gentle oversight is where I think we're heading.

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