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David Lee King

Interesting backwash about the L2 Class



Here’s some interesting reading about ALA’s Library 2.0 class. Start here:

 The short version?

  • The company doing ALA’s L2 program decided to make the class blogs, podcasts, etc open – anyone can subscribe to them.
  • There is criticism in the library blogosphere because of the tools used and because of incorrect terminology (ie., podcasts).
  • The CEO of the company doing ALA’s L2 program states in her blog post “I am going to try to use this as a learning experience for all of us because it certainly is a mirror for what may happen as you all start to move into the 2.0 world” and “So let’s use this as part of our learning experience” in this post, which was sent because of the criticism.

But apparently, some other emails were also sent, and were felt to be threatening to the recipients (at least in one case). The email was clarified a little bit in the comments to the recipients “I was asked to delete this post” post.

So why am I posting about it? Because I got really irritated.

So – to the company – if you REALLY want to treat this like the learning experience you say it is… please please please DO SO! Don’t send emails stating “I view the nature of your post on the [company name edited out] as both erroneous and possibly damaging to my business. I would like to ask you to remove the post immediately.”

Instead, say things like:

  • Thanks. How can we improve for the next class?
  • This is a pilot project, so there will be bumps along the way.
  • Or just a simple “thank you” and then forget about it.

But to be in charge of a Library 2.0 class, then to ask the person who CREATED the term Library 2.0 to delete his post? Something is really wrong there… I think you owe him an apology – that’s decidedly NOT Library 2.0.

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  • http://library.coloradocollege.edu/steve/ Steve Lawson

    On various blogs and in my del.icio.us bookmarks I made some snarky comments about The Company, and was starting to feel a little bad about it.

    Then I went back and re-read it all. And I don’t feel bad. This is a situation that calls for snark.

  • http://library.coloradocollege.edu/steve/ Steve Lawson

    On various blogs and in my del.icio.us bookmarks I made some snarky comments about The Company, and was starting to feel a little bad about it.

    Then I went back and re-read it all. And I don’t feel bad. This is a situation that calls for snark.

  • Chris

    “There is criticism in the library blogosphere because of the tools used and because of incorrect terminology (ie., podcasts).”

    Oh, go tell them to get a Kleenex(c).

  • http://freerangelibrarian.com/ K.G. Schneider

    Well, Chris, I can call a meatloaf a bagel, but it’s still not a bagel. It’s one thing if I do that at home; it’s another thing if I am teaching others what a bagel is. The initial criticism targeted at the company touting an audio file as a podcast. The criticism was, first of all, accurate, and second of all, fairly mild. The company’s response was absurd, and only got worse.

    The good news is the students are learning a lot and Michael and Jenny are doing a great job.

  • http://freerangelibrarian.com K.G. Schneider

    Well, Chris, I can call a meatloaf a bagel, but it’s still not a bagel. It’s one thing if I do that at home; it’s another thing if I am teaching others what a bagel is. The initial criticism targeted at the company touting an audio file as a podcast. The criticism was, first of all, accurate, and second of all, fairly mild. The company’s response was absurd, and only got worse.

    The good news is the students are learning a lot and Michael and Jenny are doing a great job.

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  • Chris

    “There is criticism in the library blogosphere because of the tools used and because of incorrect terminology (ie., podcasts).”

    Oh, go tell them to get a Kleenex(c).