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David Lee King

NEKLS Tech Day – Michael Stephens



MIchael Stephens’ presentation title was: Library 2.0: People, Planning & Participation

Cutting Edge libraries are finding ways to Engage Users. They are working on ways to make connections with patrons online, and to provide great experiences.

Library 2.0: breaking down barriers – in services, place, time, and what we do. Getting knowledge into the hands of users via the best means possible.

Librarian 2.0:

  • gets the social tools of web 2.0
  • understands the long tail
  • uses the Wisdom of Crowds (I need to read this!)
  • Plans for physical and online experience and collaboration

Librarian 2.0 embraces web 2.0 (but it won’t save us!)

AADL – Library Director “let us know what you need in a library.” Wow!

Rutgers study – Beer or iPods? Students said “iPods.”

Half the room has a Bloglines account… that’s pretty good!

Virtual Reference Services… sessions dropped! Didn’t work well (even though they spent $20,000, six months of training, etc). They figured they were running about $500 per question! Now they (SJCPL) do IM reference ONLY. It’s FREE. It’s EASY. And it works.

(my battery won’t last much longer… I’ll post this, then use my pen and paper, and post more later)

Beyond the 2.0 tools: More on librarian 2.0

Controlling technolust.. wanting it because it’s cool. You need to figure out if it fits into your mission, your plan, etc. Don’t follow the crowd (technoMust)! Have a techno-divorce if needed.

Librarian 2.0 makes good decisions in the web 2.0 world – quick decisions in the midst of rapid, constant change.

Evidence-based decision making… see what others are doing, what works and what doesn’t

talk to other librarians, go on a field trip.

Librarian 2.0 plans for their users. Find new ways to deliver services that meet their needs. Even involve users in planning from the beginning. ASK THEM WHAT THEY WANT.

Librarian 2.0 Builds a Culture of Trust – trusting users and staff!

Librarian 2.0 is a trendspotter:
- reads blogs, feeds, etc
- chats with colleagues
- reads outside of our field (this seems important to me)

L2 gets content!
- Content is conversation
- Content is organizing itself (via tags, etc)
- People are connecting to each other via their content

Understands the value of training
- delivered in person, online, offsite
- part of staff development, part of the culture (both up and down in a library)
- a well-trained staff can carry your message to your users

Training Web 2.0
- have a sandbox for playing
- Tell staff “why we’re doing this”

Interesting side note – Michael mentioned the gamer generation being trained to defeat the “big thing” on each level, which is known as “the boss.” So, they are being trained to defeat the boss – what happens when they get into the workplace? Hopefully, they’ll defeat the obstacle (whatever that might be) using a bit more maturity. Honestly, I was picturing a supervisor saying “no” and then seeing this tattoed kid rubbing his hands together, thinking, “I’ll get you yet!”

Comments on this entry are closed.

  • ugh

    I don’t think you properly grasp “gamers.” In fact, I think your statements at the end of this entry blatantly show your lack of understanding. What’s with essentially calling all gamers immature? Is approaching problems with a “if at first you don’t succeed, try try again” mentality “immature?” Are gamers, by nature or by generational affiliation, not up to your standards of maturity simply because they play video games? Do you really believe that, as your words seem to indicate?!?

  • http://www.davidleeking.com/ david king

    To “Ugh” – thanks for your comments. Please come share some more!

    I think you misunderstood me. I play games, so obviously I wasn’t referring to all gamers. Nor do I think all gamers are immature. If you recheck my last paragraph, you’ll see that I was talking about the “gamer generation” which would be 20-somethings and younger, also known as the millenial generation.

    So yeah – I was thinking about a high school kid (and used tattoes mainly to describe what I pictured in my head) who defeats the boss regularly, but who actually HAS a boss in a few more years, after college… hopefully by that point, that person will be more mature than they were in high school.

    Make sense?

  • http://www.davidleeking.com david king

    To “Ugh” – thanks for your comments. Please come share some more!

    I think you misunderstood me. I play games, so obviously I wasn’t referring to all gamers. Nor do I think all gamers are immature. If you recheck my last paragraph, you’ll see that I was talking about the “gamer generation” which would be 20-somethings and younger, also known as the millenial generation.

    So yeah – I was thinking about a high school kid (and used tattoes mainly to describe what I pictured in my head) who defeats the boss regularly, but who actually HAS a boss in a few more years, after college… hopefully by that point, that person will be more mature than they were in high school.

    Make sense?

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  • ugh

    I don't think you properly grasp “gamers.” In fact, I think your statements at the end of this entry blatantly show your lack of understanding. What's with essentially calling all gamers immature? Is approaching problems with a “if at first you don't succeed, try try again” mentality “immature?” Are gamers, by nature or by generational affiliation, not up to your standards of maturity simply because they play video games? Do you really believe that, as your words seem to indicate?!?