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David Lee King

Three Types of Website Content? I Don’t Think So



Shane Diffily has a blog, wrote a book on website management, and posted this article (I think to help sell his book). The artcicle states that “website content can typically be classed into one of three types” – then he lists the types of website content – content that ” persuades, sells, and reassures.

I think he’s been hangin’ with corporate types a little too long. For starters, his OWN POST doesn’t really fit into any of the tree categories. I suppose it could be argued that it would be Selling, since he links to info on his book at the end of the article… but is it really? In reality, the actual content is all about providing info (in this case, info on web content). So it’s not Selling (nor is it Reassuring or Persuading).

And what about coding sites telling you how to create Jave widgets? Or, for that matter, the HUGE realm of information-based content (like, say libraries should be putting out)? Nothing on my library’s website is persuading, selling, or reassuring… it’s all about providing information and providing access to that information. That’s what we as libraries do!

Then there’s the whole chunk of the online ENTERTAINMENT industry… is free music on MySpace selling music? Hmm… for that matter – what about the rest of MySpace? Info about me? Definitely not selling, persuading, or reassuring.

Sorta makes you think…

Comments on this entry are closed.

  • http://www.diffily.com Shane

    Hi Dave – Thanks for the comments about my recent article. I should have been more specific, but was short of time when writing it (I’ll be more careful next time!)

    “Sell” content need not be just a transaction-it could be about ‘selling’ an idea, causing someone to do something, etc. For example, the ‘Sell’ content on the website of the UK Labour Party is to get people to vote Labour. The “Sell” content on the website of the World WildLife Fund is to get people to join the organisation (or do something about ecology change). The sell content on Amazon is to get people to buy a book (or a DVD, or a fridge, etc)

    The “sell” content on my own site is get people to believe in and act on my ideas. I “persuade” them into that by creating a (hopefully) professional appearance (e.g. about me info, photo, privacy details, good secondary content, nice design, etc). I then reassure them they have done the right thing in trusting me by providing content details if they want to complain/compliment me, and newsletter by which they can stay in touch with changes, (a kind-of after sales service) etc.

    A more general example is MySpace. It ‘persudes’ partly through the good testimonials of so many other users. It sells by making is so damn easy to create a new site. It reassures by providing good help and support, and by its efforts to defeat all those nasty guys who use it for fraud and worse.

    UIE had an interesting piece about a similar idea (called Inukshuk content)
    on their site earlier last year: https://www.uie.com/articles/inukshuk_content/

  • http://ostrava-foto.ic.cz/ Arsen

    Steve Rubel has some interesting statistics on MySpace:
    http://www.micropersuasion.com/2006/03/myspace_mania.html

    In short, 61 + million registered users with 21+ million unique visitors.

    If those guys offering free music are not “persuading” or “selling”, I don’t know what the rest of the record industry is doing.

  • http://ostrava-foto.ic.cz Arsen

    Steve Rubel has some interesting statistics on MySpace:
    http://www.micropersuasion.com/2006/03/myspace_mania.html

    In short, 61 + million registered users with 21+ million unique visitors.

    If those guys offering free music are not “persuading” or “selling”, I don’t know what the rest of the record industry is doing.

  • http://www.diffily.com/ Shane

    Hi Dave – Thanks for the comments about my recent article. I should have been more specific, but was short of time when writing it (I'll be more careful next time!)

    “Sell” content need not be just a transaction-it could be about 'selling' an idea, causing someone to do something, etc. For example, the 'Sell' content on the website of the UK Labour Party is to get people to vote Labour. The “Sell” content on the website of the World WildLife Fund is to get people to join the organisation (or do something about ecology change). The sell content on Amazon is to get people to buy a book (or a DVD, or a fridge, etc)

    The “sell” content on my own site is get people to believe in and act on my ideas. I “persuade” them into that by creating a (hopefully) professional appearance (e.g. about me info, photo, privacy details, good secondary content, nice design, etc). I then reassure them they have done the right thing in trusting me by providing content details if they want to complain/compliment me, and newsletter by which they can stay in touch with changes, (a kind-of after sales service) etc.

    A more general example is MySpace. It 'persudes' partly through the good testimonials of so many other users. It sells by making is so damn easy to create a new site. It reassures by providing good help and support, and by its efforts to defeat all those nasty guys who use it for fraud and worse.

    UIE had an interesting piece about a similar idea (called Inukshuk content)
    on their site earlier last year: https://www.uie.com/articles/inukshuk_content/

  • http://www.light-box.com.au Light box signs

    Hi Dave

    Videos on Youtube are replacing most content at the speed of light. TV ruled our lives for 50 years and now online video is just the next step