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David Lee King

Two Stupid Stories for Friday



1. Blogger Kicked out of Stadium for Live Blogging the Game – dude kicked out of baseball game for live blogging… I guess they noticed his laptop? I’m calling this stupid because gee… you don’t actually NEED a laptop to live blog… you can do it with your cellphone. Video, text, pictures – all can be easily used to live blog an event. And I doubt officials plan to check everyone’s cellphones at the gate!

2. Time Magazine’s 5 Worst Websites article: Time Magazine actually called Second Life a website. That’s like calling Dungeons and Dragons a book.

What do these two stories have in common? Old media and organizations attempting to deal with and make sense out of web 2.0. They’ll figure it out eventually…

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  • dig deeper

    The NCAA/blogger-journalist story is much more interesting than that. See the writer’s blog, http://www.courier-journal.com/blogs/bennett/blog.html and the Chicago Tribune editorial linked in the piece you linked to (‘Bloggers get the boot’, 6/24/2007).

    The NCAA circulated a memo to the press box saying “no blogging”. The writer’s editors saw this as a restriction on their first amendment rights to report on and analyze the game and instructed him otherwise. The editorial in the Chicago Tribune points out that courts have previously upheld unofficial broadcasters’ rights to report what happens in a game after it happens, that a public event is not the creative property of the broadcasters.

    So what’s at stake here is not the NCAA-vs-bloggers but big-corporations-vs-the-constitution.

  • dig deeper

    The NCAA/blogger-journalist story is much more interesting than that. See the writer’s blog, http://www.courier-journal.com/blogs/bennett/blog.html and the Chicago Tribune editorial linked in the piece you linked to (‘Bloggers get the boot’, 6/24/2007).

    The NCAA circulated a memo to the press box saying “no blogging”. The writer’s editors saw this as a restriction on their first amendment rights to report on and analyze the game and instructed him otherwise. The editorial in the Chicago Tribune points out that courts have previously upheld unofficial broadcasters’ rights to report what happens in a game after it happens, that a public event is not the creative property of the broadcasters.

    So what’s at stake here is not the NCAA-vs-bloggers but big-corporations-vs-the-constitution.

  • http://roycekitts.blogspot.com/ royce

    Sure they call second life a website, but the other stuff they say about sl is pretty much dead on.

    the only thing my friends and I can agree on about second life is how cool it is to fly.

  • http://roycekitts.blogspot.com royce

    Sure they call second life a website, but the other stuff they say about sl is pretty much dead on.

    the only thing my friends and I can agree on about second life is how cool it is to fly.

  • http://www.goblin-cartoons.com joshua m. neff

    Time Magazine actually called Second Life a website. That’s like calling Dungeons and Dragons a book.

    As a social software geek and an old school RPG player, that line made me smile. A lot.

  • http://www.goblin-cartoons.com/ joshua m. neff

    Time Magazine actually called Second Life a website. That’s like calling Dungeons and Dragons a book.

    As a social software geek and an old school RPG player, that line made me smile. A lot.