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David Lee King

Attracting Friends, Part 3: Facebook



This is part 3 (or really part 4 or 5) of my slowly-growing series on organization-based friending in social networks. Here’s what I have so far:

Now, on to Facebook. How do you attract friends using Facebook? You really have to think of your organization two different ways with Facebook – think in terms of organizations and of people. Organizationally, you can create Pages and Groups. Personally, you can create an individual Facebook account that you use professionally.

For example, one of our Youth Services librarians has created a personal Facebook account specifically to connect with our teen audience. It’s working – she’s gathered over 500 friends – mostly teens in Topeka. And she uses the account to push out stuff to that group.

Ideas on attracting friends in Facebook:

  • search for local people, request to friend them
  • friend local Facebook Pages – businesses, authors, etc.
  • Advertise your Facebook Page outside of Facebook (i.e., website, twitter, myspace, email newsletter, etc)
  • Business cards with Facebook contact info at a public services desk, passed out at programs
  • Teach a class on Facebook
  • Create a Facebook Ad to advertise your Page to other Facebook users (there’s a cost attached)
  • Leave those business cards at place local Facebook users hang out, like coffee shops
  • Have good content on your page – send your blog there, add some photos that connect to flickr, same with youtube
  • photos and visuals are important – helps you look more real
  • Especially for people using a personal Facebook account – interact with your Facebook friends!

What else? How do you attract friends using Facebook?

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  • Pingback: Attracting Friends, Part 2: Twitter | David Lee King

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  • http://wordsfornerds.wordpress.com/ laura k

    What I’m actually more curious about is what librarians use facebook for once they have friends. You mention the Youth Services librarian using it to push thing out to the teens who’ve friended her; I’d love to hear more about what kinds of things are being shared.

    These posts are great; very interesting! Thanks,

    laura

  • http://wordsfornerds.wordpress.com laura k

    What I’m actually more curious about is what librarians use facebook for once they have friends. You mention the Youth Services librarian using it to push thing out to the teens who’ve friended her; I’d love to hear more about what kinds of things are being shared.

    These posts are great; very interesting! Thanks,

    laura

  • davidleeking

    Laura – fun idea. Maybe I should look into that and report back, huh?

  • davidleeking

    Laura – fun idea. Maybe I should look into that and report back, huh?

  • http://thecareersgrouplibrary.wordpress.com/ Helen

    Our careers service is expanding our Facebook presence and using it to broaden the reach of our information services – encouraging students to use it as a remote quick enquiry service.

    We also use it to promote careers events – and to provide a continuity of information provision from preparatory advice prior to the event, to follow-up links, podcasts, and presentations generated by the event.

    We’ve often found that we get more meaningful interaction when we use more specific special-interest pages, rather than a general, broad ‘library’ page. People are more likely to be a fan and check the page when they know the updates relate just to their interest. Although we can’t always predict which of these pages will take off. There seem to be a few factors here – lack of other sources of info, pre-existing online community… and more we need to figure out.

    Thanks for the suggestions on how to recruit friends – I particularly like the idea of business cards.

  • http://thecareersgrouplibrary.wordpress.com/ Helen

    Our careers service is expanding our Facebook presence and using it to broaden the reach of our information services – encouraging students to use it as a remote quick enquiry service.

    We also use it to promote careers events – and to provide a continuity of information provision from preparatory advice prior to the event, to follow-up links, podcasts, and presentations generated by the event.

    We’ve often found that we get more meaningful interaction when we use more specific special-interest pages, rather than a general, broad ‘library’ page. People are more likely to be a fan and check the page when they know the updates relate just to their interest. Although we can’t always predict which of these pages will take off. There seem to be a few factors here – lack of other sources of info, pre-existing online community… and more we need to figure out.

    Thanks for the suggestions on how to recruit friends – I particularly like the idea of business cards.

  • Ken

    Do you think there’s an advantage to use a Facebook page to promote your business vs a Facebook Group?

    Just curious.

  • Ken

    Do you think there’s an advantage to use a Facebook page to promote your business vs a Facebook Group?

    Just curious.

  • davidleeking

    Ken – good question! I’d say it depends. Facebook Groups are better for holding conversations about specific things, while Facebook Pages are great for representing an organization in Facebook – you can have some discussion, but not quite as much as with a Facebook Group.

  • davidleeking

    Ken – good question! I’d say it depends. Facebook Groups are better for holding conversations about specific things, while Facebook Pages are great for representing an organization in Facebook – you can have some discussion, but not quite as much as with a Facebook Group.

  • Ken

    I would definitely agree. It would be interesting to see which businesses choose a Page vs a Group. For example, I think Red Bull has an official Page, but not an official Group.

    I think your point about Groups stimulating better conversation is spot on. Although you can find some of the same tools on Pages.

  • Ken

    I would definitely agree. It would be interesting to see which businesses choose a Page vs a Group. For example, I think Red Bull has an official Page, but not an official Group.

    I think your point about Groups stimulating better conversation is spot on. Although you can find some of the same tools on Pages.

  • http://darkomajcenovic.blogspot.com/ Darko

    Thanks for some great tips! Will come handy with my libraries FB group. It’s easy to set one up and people flood in once a few power users add it to their profiles. But what to do with it when it’s up? We tried asking questions but the discussion never picked up any momentum. Even after mass-contacting all the group members there was only one person who responded. How does one start a conversation on a FB group?

  • http://darkomajcenovic.blogspot.com/ Darko

    Thanks for some great tips! Will come handy with my libraries FB group. It’s easy to set one up and people flood in once a few power users add it to their profiles. But what to do with it when it’s up? We tried asking questions but the discussion never picked up any momentum. Even after mass-contacting all the group members there was only one person who responded. How does one start a conversation on a FB group?