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David Lee King

Generations Online – new Pew Internet Report



Check out Generations Online in 2009, the newest Pew Internet report. Go read it – there’s alot of good stuff in it.

Here are some tidbits that I found interesting:

“Contrary to the image of Generation Y as the “Net Generation,” internet users in their 20s do not dominate every aspect of online life. Generation X is the most likely group to bank, shop, and look for health information online. Boomers are just as likely as Generation Y to make travel reservations online. And even Silent Generation internet users are competitive when it comes to email…”

Wow. Interesting tidbit from page 2: “The biggest increase in internet use since 2005 can be seen in the 70-75 year-old age group. While just over one-fourth (26%) of 70-75 year olds were online in 2005, 45% of that age group is currently online.” – Did you see that? What a HUGE jump – now, almost HALF of 70-75 year olds are online. Amazing.

“… email remains the most popular online activity, particularly among older internet users. Fully 74% of internet users age 64 and older send and receive email, making email the most popular online activity for this age group.” (see my post about email reference and think about how you can update that service).

How’s your health info online (and at your reference desk)? – “In particular, older internet users are significantly more likely than younger generations to look online for health information.”

And etc… good stuff (9 pages worth).

Pic by fran**

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  • http://www.findingdulcinea.com/ Jen O’Neill

    It’s interesting to see how “digital immigrants” are taking to technology very well. Many of my graduate school professors were not inclined to embrace technology, but over the course of a couple of years, it’s getting so much better. Let’s face it: technology is where learning is at these days.

  • http://www.findingdulcinea.com Jen O’Neill

    It’s interesting to see how “digital immigrants” are taking to technology very well. Many of my graduate school professors were not inclined to embrace technology, but over the course of a couple of years, it’s getting so much better. Let’s face it: technology is where learning is at these days.