CIL2009: Handhelds & Mobile

Ben Smith, Sheryl Bai, someone else…, Aaron Schmidt

First up – Handhelds at UCHC School of Medicine

PDA Program:

  • PDAs supported by the library since 2001
  • Library purchased PDAs for staff
  • Did an in-service class for staff
  • did some student and faculty training, too

Ben:

Current PDA Initiative:

meet with faculty, then test handhelds, create instructions.

Train students so they can be a resource to ther students. Cool.

They hold PDA clinics, help them install apps, etc.

Considerations:

  • which handheld platform?
  • Windows Mobile 2003 or Mobile 5?
  • Smartphones?
  • They’re limited because they’ve developed stuff on Windows Mobile platform, so they have to use those…

Smartphones:

  • two devices in one
  • cheaper
  • you have a phone contract too – have to make sure students understand this
  • screen resolution can be worse on a smartphone (aside – I love my iPhone)
  • not all have touch screen functionality

Handy software utilities:

  • dotPocket
  • DeepFreeze
  • ActiveSync
  • Microsoft Remote Display Control (displays the PDA on a computer screen, hence a live demo during a presentation)
  • My Mobiler
  • Windows Mobile Device Center

Chris Tonjes, Aaron Schmidt

Chris (CIO, DC Public Library)

their iphone app:

three layers – transaction layer, data layer, presentation layer (I think)

Goals:

  • continue horizontal integration of our ILS
  • presents an alternative delivery of online catalog – like most, not happy with their ILS. So this gave them a great excuse to start experimenting
  • first foray into mobile world
  • leverages the power of the iTunes app store – the delivery method of the future
  • model for other projects
  • provides tangible near term ROI and extended library use and awareness
  • leverage! Code and analysis used for …
  • They have a blackberry version too
  • more online catalogs! playing with VuFInd
  • Integration/direct download target for content from our electronic resource providers 9Gale and Overdrive)
  • iPhone 3.0! Ecommerce – fine and other payments from within app!
  • model for near future projects (kindle or other readers)

Showing their release roadmap – they are planning for the future

DCPL iPhone App – fast facts:

  • 2199 downloads so far
  • 85 in the last week placed holds with it
  • works with SirsiDynix enterprise portal search discovery tool
  • plug in web service
  • took about 100 total hours of programming time
  • we can forecast LOE to modify for use with ibistro and elibrary
  • code available for download

DCPL SMS Text Msg – Bill

Reach out to the younger people is a goal

they send notices, announcements

patrons opt-in on website registration page

increase library event participation via same day notifications – great reminder of events.

messages and notices tailored to SMS limitations/requirements (ie., message size & delivery)

Normal txt stuff: small messages, if you have more than one to send, you have to do each as separate messages

Cost to the library = 0

They schedule the txt msgs in the middle of the day – important point. You don’t want them sent at 2am! And you WANT them sent when people can see them, for reminders…

Aaron:

in charge of how this should look and feel.

started making paper prototypes

Even did user testing with paper mock-ups to see if the idea worked

It IS possible to design a BAD iphone app… they wanted to avoid that

There’s a PSD element library for iphones so you can quickly create a photoshop mockup

Giving examples of how it works

Next?

QR codes,barcode reading.

HUGE potential for these mobile devices.

CIL2009: What is the Return on Investment for Your Library?

Speakers: Neal K. Kaske, Mary Lou Cumberpatch, Guy Dobson

Key questions:

  • what are the levels of use made of the electronic resources offered by your library
  • what are the estimated cost savings fromt he use of these electronic resources

Assumptions:

  • value of staff time saved can be estimated
  • using only direct labor costs provides conservative estimates
  • value of the public’s time can also be estimated! conservative estimate for general public’s time is placed at $6 an hour, below minimum wage – so if patron uses library website for 10 minutes, that’s $1 in value.
  • levels of use measured by standard web metric packages is accurate
  • usage numbers are local numbers…
  • some search/time numbers are estimated… ie., time to search for phone calls is 15 minutes (so it’s a rough average)

Must know what we are counting: looks like they defined what a search was for each database they included in the count and equated that with a patron coming into the library, pulling out an index, and doing a search. That type of stuff…

aside … I’m sitting 15 feet from the screen, and I can’t read the slide! at least 15 points, with sub-points, in small font, all text… break that slide up!

Showing an example of data and $$ values associated with that data – ie., website visited 3 million times, dollar value = $322,000 – page views = 1 minute = $.10 each…

Guy Dobson:

He is figuring total value by mining SIRSI records on borrowing use and an averaged item price. Nice. Some patron’s library cards are worth more than $10,000 per year, because they check out so much!

CIL2009: Learning Solutions Through Technology

Sarah Houghton-Jan, Lori Reed

Lori:

First time in history we have 4 generations of people in the workforce. Some people are always wired, some aren’t there yet.

another consideration – time & money. Need to figure out how best to use our money/time for training…

Showing a “Calculated Savings” slide – showing how much they spend in mileage reimbursements for travel time to and from training. Wow.

elearning solutions:

  • asynchronous (blackboard, not all there at same time, learning 2.0 classes)
  • synchronous training – all online at the same time (webjunction classes, webinars – opal, webex, go to meeting, adobe connect, dim dim, etc) – have to have bandwidth to support this type of training.
  • blended – blending both together

Giving examples of blended learning: using physical and digital social spaces…

Best learning is informal learning

Don’t put the cart before the horse – there are some things you have to figure out first:

  • Determine what the need is first – what do they need to learn/to improve their jobs, etc
  • Then determine who the audience is

Talkshoe as a good tool for communication. WebJunction as another (their webinars).

Twitter is a great way to reinforce learning.

Tips to implement elearning:

  • you need support from the top
  • include IT in discussions early on
  • trainer, train thyself
  • don’t put speed over quality – if it fails, elearning will get a bad name.Make sure you’re doing it correct!
  • have a plan – create goals
  • be prepared to demonstrate ROI – might be costs!
  • enlist the help of tech-savvy staff
  • look for support from local businesses

Sarah:

Oops … missed a bit. Starting now…

Tech2Know Program Plan:

series of short web-based how-to guides, tutorials, etc. Sorta like a 23 Things program for competencies. One topic a week…

3 follow-up elements:

1. permanent online discussion forums for each topic

2. tech playground

3. an ask the techies week when the helpdesk would target lingering issues people have had about anything

Some core principles:

prizes – important! Library Genius 2.0 t-shirts from ACPL, find free or low-cost swag – USB drives that cost $4, etc.

Why invest in staff training? save money, strengthen skills, improve customer service, shows commitment to lifelong learning, increases staff retention, motivates staff to keep learning, increases efficiency

Benefits: really helps improve staff – their skills, their job descriptions, future training eneds, helps with performance evals, consistent customer service. That “come back next tuesday when Jill’s at the desk” statement? Not acceptable.

Project Planning: start with goals.

Planning questions:

what are your goals?

who manages the project?

Do you have or need to create a skills list?

Do you have a timeline in mind?

What are your resources (funding and staff)?

What training resources exist, and which ones need to be created?

Ensure staff buy-in:

  • listen – if you ask, use their input
  • keep everyone informed
  • reassure staff they don’t have to know it all now
  • managers MUST follow project plan
  • hold a brainstorming session or party
  • fun. rewards. food.

Admin buy-in:

  • write a purpose statement
  • determine measurable deliverables
  • build training in to performance evals
  • train admin/management first or separately

Creating a training program:

  • decide on types and numbers of training
  • start with the basic topics
  • open training to all staff
  • mandatory or voluntary?
  • training budget based on staff needs
  • set goals and rewards

Ongoing learning:

  • Do a mix of scheduled and unscheduled learning…
  • give staff 15 minutes a day to study/learn
  • schedule 1 off-desk hour for self-study
  • encourage conference/lecture attendance
  • share online tutorials, etc

Tips: ask students to dream at the end – if you ruled the library, what would you change now, after learning this stuff? (came from Michael Stephens)