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David Lee King

iPads in Libraries



See the Youtube version in HD

Going to ALA 2010 in Washington, D. C.? If so, please consider participating in the BIGWIG Showcase! What is the BIGWIG Showcase? It’s a fun, highly interactive way to learn about a lot of topics at once! Here’s a list of the topics for this year’s Showcase:

  • Libraries MUST Have A New Electronic Content Access and Distribution Infrastructure  (Michael Porter)
  • User Research on a Shoestring (Erin White and Susan Teague-Rector)
  • Information Overload & Personal Information Management (Bohyun Kim)
  • iPad and Tablet computers (David Lee King)
  • Teaching with Twitter (Ellen Filgo)
  • Qrcodes & Mobile Knowledge Networks (Bonnie Rosalen and Kelly Sattler)

And yes – I’m doing one … my presentation is on the Apple iPad and the new breed of tablet PCs that are coming out in the next couple of years. I show off the iPad and provide some examples of how to use one in a library setting.

What do YOU need to do? Two simple things:

  1. Watch the video, and leave a comment if you want to
  2. Attend the Showcase! I’ll talk briefly about the iPad, possibly even show one off … then we’ll chat – answer questions, debate the merits of the iPad, etc… and then you’ll be able to rotate off and talk to the other amazing presenters (listed above).

Simple stuff, huh? Make SURE to attend the BIGWIG ShowcaseMonday, June 28, 2010 from 10:30am to Noon at the Renaissance Washington Grand BR South/Central. See you there!

Comments on this entry are closed.

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  • http://kenleyneufeld.com Kenley Neufeld

    In our next iteration of laptop checkouts, we may purchase some iPads for student use. Ideally, we would have some bluetooth keyboards along with that.

    In an academic library setting, they aren't a real good replacement for word processing (need footnotes & page numbering) but it could work real well for database access and web browsing. There is an added cost to configure the printing options, but printing from the iPad is possible for a minimal cost.

    See you in DC.

  • Abpc

    Libraries use American Book Prices Current to find the fair market value of books, manuscripts, maps, broadsides, autographs, etc. from auction prices. It's by subscription and what we have done is to set up so that the site “knows” when an iPad, iPhone or BlackBerry is connecting so that the views optimize without the user having to get an app of some sort. Works beautifully, and we hope that other subscription services will do the same.
    Katharine Leab

  • Bakerl

    I agree that the iPad may be a little short on creating content, but it may offer more promise in how our library users consume content. I'm particularly interested in its potential as a new way of serving the library's digital media collection. Right now our students have to come physically to the library building to check out CDs or videos, or to view the material in house. What if we could make this material browseable, findable, and ultimately deliverable over an iPad?

    Imagine being able to go to the library on an iPad and accessing the Digital Media Collection at a touch. Users could flip through album covers or video cover art, select one by tapping it, call up the list of tracks, view the program notes, etc. to help them decide if this is something they want to view. Tapping the play button would start streaming the content directly to their device. They could listen wherever they happened to be. Classroom teachers could use their iPad as a presentation device and show the video through a projector to an entire class.

    The iPad offers a unique user interface that would make interacting with the media and its metadata much more enjoyable and convenient, which would in turn translate into better research and learning experiences. Media could be consumed by groups of students instead of being watched in isolation in a viewing booth. Students could annotate portions of the music or video with their own notes or reactions, they could rate their impressions of what they are watching, and perhaps make these reflections available to others in their class or on the network. Media now becomes social.

    All this depends to a large part on the library's being able to develop a streaming media interface of some kind that works well with an iPad. I hope to be at the Bigwig Showcase at ALA if the plane reservation allows it and would love to talk over possibilities with someone, either at ALA or email.

  • http://www.davidleeking.com davidleeking

    Cool – hope to see you there! Keep thinking along those lines – I think this
    type of thing is exactly what we need.

  • Test

    Are you ok? You seem highly irritated or at least unhappy. You also don't seem like you're all that happy with iPads.

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  • Deborah

    So far, my experience with iPad as been as a user—I love my iPad! I have several readers loaded (in addition to iBooks) and a couple of apps that help me handle committee work, etc… (including Pages, ReaddleDocs,and Instapaper.) I just recently purchased my first magazine via the iPad (a copy of Prevention Magazine)—and I really see this format holding promise for electronic downloads of material with graphic-intensive content (something my Kindle does not do well).

    Because I tweet about my ebook experiences (with the iPad and the Kindle), I'm finding I'm receiving more and more questions about ereaders from some of our local/campus users—enough that I'm developing a workshop on ebooks and ereaders for this fall. While electronic textbooks have not really taken off yet (at least on our campus), I think the iPad might be the tool that really helps e-textbooks to become more of an option.

  • Deborah

    So far, my experience with iPad as been as a user—I love my iPad! I have several readers loaded (in addition to iBooks) and a couple of apps that help me handle committee work, etc… (including Pages, ReaddleDocs,and Instapaper.) I just recently purchased my first magazine via the iPad (a copy of Prevention Magazine)—and I really see this format holding promise for electronic downloads of material with graphic-intensive content (something my Kindle does not do well).

    Because I tweet about my ebook experiences (with the iPad and the Kindle), I'm finding I'm receiving more and more questions about ereaders from some of our local/campus users—enough that I'm developing a workshop on ebooks and ereaders for this fall. While electronic textbooks have not really taken off yet (at least on our campus), I think the iPad might be the tool that really helps e-textbooks to become more of an option.

  • http://www.cashforipads.com sell ipad

    ipad seem to a brilliant piece of technology.