Face2Face Book News

Face2Face: Using facebook, Twitter, and other Social Media Tools to Create Great Customer Connections Just some recent Face2Face-related book news! For those not up-to-speed, my newest book, Face2Face: Using Facebook, twitter, and other Social Media Tools to Make Great Customer Connections, was published in September.

Book News, Inc recently published a short review of my book. Here’s the review:

King (digital services director, Topeka & Shawnee County Public Library) explain the keys to making social media work for your organization. They are listening, authentic communication, and joining in on social networks beyond your own website. Writing in a casual style, he recommends that organizations also use a casual style, coupled with quick and honest responses. Some of the examples relate to work in libraries or events in Topeka, Kansas.

Very fair and nice review – sweet!

Also, just yesterday, an article/interview of mine was published on Business Insider – 5 Ways to Run as Social media Campaign Like a Pro. Check out the article! For some reason, they linked to my first book (Designing the Digital Experience), but what the hey – a link is a link, is it not?

One more – a recent interview for the Ontario Library Association’s Education Institute.

If you haven’t bought/checked out/borrowed/read Face2Face … please do!

Relaunching Ebooks for Libraries website

My library created EbooksforLibraries.com earlier this year as an online petition to the Big Six publishers (read more here, here, and here).

We finished phase one of our project, so we sat back and thought … “hmm. What should we do with ebooksforlibraries next?”

Watch the video in this post to find out the answer to that! And then go visit our first post on the relaunched ebooksforlibraries website (and make sure to subscribe, too).

Our goal is pretty simple. There are a lot of really great blogs and news sites devoted to ebooks and the publishing industry, and we don’t want to try to mimic those. But as we’ve been following those sites, and all the many stories surrounding ebooks and libraries, we realized something: no one’s telling libraries what any of these changes actually MEAN for libraries. No one’s saying “great – big-name publisher #1 says you own your ebook files. What changes tomorrow for our public library because of that announcement? What’s that mean next week, or even next year”

So our goal is to try and answer those practical questions surrounding ebooks for libraries.

Fingers crossed!

Tips for going on TV

WIBW StudiosMy library is lucky – our local TV news station loves the library, and gives us a spot every Tuesday afternoon called “Library Tuesday.” The afternoon anchor does a quick 3-minute interview with someone from the library.

Once in a while, that someone is me. I’ve been able to talk about a website redesign, a new library catalog, and our Podcamp Topeka annual conference.

If you combine that with also being on regional TV news a couple of times for my new book Face2Face, I can honestly say I’ve been on TV more than the average librarian :-)

Between being prepped by the library’s marketing director, by reading a couple of articles, and just by doing it, I have picked up a few pointers along the way that I’d like to share with you.

So – here are some Tips for being interviewed on TV:

Looking good on TV:

  • Dress the part. Check out what the interviewer usually wears (by watching a clip online or by watching the day before your interview), and dress in a similar style. Stick to plain colors – no loud stripes or big shiny jewelry.
  • Look interested and attentive. So mind that posture! Sit up straight.
  • Smile.
  • Don’t be nervous. If you’re like me, I tend to think “how many people will be watching this?” Then it suddenly feels like I’m talking to thousands of people. Not a good thing to think about! Instead, look around you in the studio – my guess is that there are probably 2-5 people there, including you. If you think like that – that you’re only talking to a handful of people, you’ll probably feel much better!
  • Talk to the interviewer. They might direct you to just look at them. So do that, and simply have a good, quick conversation with that person (yes, with lights shining on you and a camera pointing at your head … just ignore that stuff).
  • Ask where to look. If no one tells you, feel free to ask the anchor or the camera operator where you should look. You will usually be looking at the interviewer. But if you want to look at a camera (which loosely translates to looking at the people watching on TV), there’s one main camera and 1-2 other cameras that get cut-away shots, etc.
  • It’s just a conversation. Don’t read a script on-air, don’t memorize something and then try to say it back. You will come out sounding pretty amateurish if you do that. Just talk about whatever it is you wanted to talk about with the interviewer. They’re professionals, and they can help steer the conversation where it needs to go (sometimes, not always).

 Getting your message across:

  • Stay on message. be brief. If the interviewer strays off-topic, feel free to steer that person back if you can.
  • Be succinct. Short, succinct answers are the best answers in interviews. It gives the editors something to edit down to if it’s a pre-recorded interview, and it helps get your points across clearly in a live setting. TV likes byte-sized bits of information, so the more you can do that, the more (potentially) you will be heard.
  • Be knowledgeable. At my library, our marketing person sends information out in advance to the news anchor that will be interviewing me. That way, he knows what we’ll be talking about. If that happens, make sure you get a copy of that information and that you can talk about that topic for three minutes. It’s helpful to have 1-3 key messages you want to get across, and to stay focused on that message during the interview.
  • Have a closing thought. More than once, I’ve been asked “is there anything else you want to say?” I generally have a main last point ready, just in case they ask.

Other important things to remember:

  • The camera and the microphone are always on. Just assume that, even if it’s not always true. So don’t do anything that would be embarrassing if it “accidentally” went live (cursing, picking your nose, etc.).
  • Don’t repeat the question! This isn’t a huge deal in a live studio setting, but when the interviewer is doing a pre-recorded thing, don’t repeat their questions, or back into your answer. Just answer the question succinctly. More than once, I’ve seen an editor “snip” the first part of someone’s quote out-of-context, and then that’s the “official” quote used as part of the story. So none of that “Hmm. I know it looks that way, but…” Instead, just jump into the thing you really need to say.
  • Mute that phone. Or even better, turn it off. Once, my phone was muted during a live TV interview … but it started buzzing in my pocket, and I had to turn it off on-air. Sorta embarrassing!

Now – go out there, get on the news, and share good stuff about your library!

Help out the Gates Foundation

Gates FoundationSomeone asked me to share this, and it seems like a good thing, so …

“The Gates Foundation’s Global Libraries Initiative is currently exploring ways to supplement their current support of public libraries in ways that foster innovation and dramatically accelerate positive and lasting change in libraries throughout the U.S. and around the world. The following survey is a tool that the Global Libraries Initiative is using to gather thoughts and ideas about how libraries can best serve their communities in a future where ebooks and ubiquitous digital content is the norm.

Please consider taking a few minutes and filling out the survey to help the Foundation with its future planning!”