What’s Missing?

Ever wanted to know what your customers think is missing from a service point in your library?

There’s an easy way to find out … just ask! Post something that asks “what’s missing?” and start gathering answers. For example:

  • Want to find out what’s missing on your public PCs? Tape a form to the table by each computer and ask for comments.
  • Have a teen room, and you want to find out what’s missing there? Put up a white board that asks “what’s missing?” (and be prepared for some snarky responses. They’re teens, after all).
  • Have a mobile website or app? Do what my library did. The last link on the main page of our mobile Boopsie app is “What’s Missing? Send us a Suggestion.” Clicking that link leads to an email form that gets sent to me. And believe me, people fill that out!
  • Ask through your library’s social media channels.

You can ask a similar “what’s missing” question on a website, in a room of the library, or even in the stacks. The point is this: if you want to make improvements in the library, you need to find out what’s missing … and fix that stuff.

Pic by crdotx

Seven Strategies for Growing Community on your Blog

I recently saw this post at problogger.net about strategies for growing community on your blog, and thought the suggestions were great. Here are the 7 strategies mentioned:

  1. Write in a conversational voice. I usually call this “talk like you type.”
  2. Invite interaction. That means you need to ask people what they think!
  3. Consider a dedicated community area. This can be accomplished by creating a forum or a Facebook Group, for example.
  4. Use interactive and accessible mediums. Blogs that allow comments, Google Plus hangouts, etc.
  5. Run projects and challenges. These are basically tricky ways to jumpstart conversations and interaction. Examples include a 31 Days to a better …” set of posts, or a Photo a Day meme.
  6. Real life events. talk about what’s actually happening in your community. Relate it back to your library.
  7. Put your readers in the spotlight. Use guest posts, link to them on social media discussions, comment on their blogs, etc.

I’m curious – anyone do any of these? Which ones are the most useful in your library or blog?

Pic by Chiot’s Run

My CIL 2013 Presentations

Here are the presentations I gave while at Computers in Libraries (not counting my presentation on 15 Web Design Trends for 2013):

 

15 Web Design Trends for 2013

Here’s one of my presentations for Computers in Libraries 2013 – great conference! I’m posting this one separately, since there’s some good stuff here. I poked around in Google, and condensed a lot of “web design predictions” posts into this handy list of 15 web design trends for 2013. Which ones are you thinking about?

  1. Content first
  2. Design simplicity
  3. UX Centered Design
  4. App style interfaces
  5. Responsive design
  6. No skeuomorphism
  7. coding languages (as in HTML/CSS/Javascript)
  8. Fixed header bars
  9. Large photo backgrounds
  10. CSS Transparency
  11. Social media badges
  12. Infinite scrolling
  13. Homepage feature tours
  14. Sliding panels
  15. Parallax design

Enjoy! I’ll post links to my other CIL 2013 presentations in another post.

Hacking, Making, & Creating at the Library – a webinar

I gave this presentation last week at a webinar for the Southeastern New York Library Resources Council. There were a LOT of great questions afterwards. Lots of libraries are thinking about hackerspaces, makerspaces, etc … and trying to answer the “why” – as in why should we do this? What’s available? What are other libraries doing?

This presentation gave an overview of what’s happening, and also gave some tips on where to start.

Fun times!