Twitter has Analytics!

Timeline Activity - Twitter AdsWay back in 2011, Twitter announced they were starting to offer Analytics for some Twitter accounts. Finally – almost two years later, they are offering analytics to everyone!

Here’s how you access those analytics:

  • Get into your Twitter account (the web version)
  • Click the Settings icon (looks like a gear)
  • Click Twitter Ads (and sign in again. If you haven’t signed up for Twitter Ads, you’ll need to do that first. No cost associated with signing up, so do it for the analytics)
  • Once you’re logged into Twitter Ads, click Analytics (in the black bar at the top of the page)
  • You’re in!

What types of analytics do you get? 

Right now, there are two choices – Timeline Activity and Followers:

Timeline Activity

The Timeline Activity view provides most of the analytics. At the top of the page is a handy graph showing Mentions, Follows, and Unfollows for the last month. Hover over the graph, and you can see a per-day breakdown of those numbers.

Below the graph are Recent Tweets. This shows individual tweets, going back all the way to your first tweet (I think – I scrolled back about a year)!

For each tweet, you can see these analytics:

  • # of Faves
  • # of Retweets
  • # of Replies
  • If there’s a link included in the tweet, you can see how many clicks that tweet received.

For example, I now know my tweet about Twitter analytics (as of last night) was favorited 7 times, retweeted 3 times, and the link included with the tweet was clicked 45 times.

You can also choose which tweets you want to see – All, Best, or Good.

  • Best shows the top 15% of tweets with some level of engagement, going back to August 27 (so, about 10 months).
  • Good shows the top two-thirds of tweets with some level of engagement, in that same timeframe.
  • All shows all tweets in that same timeframe.

This page also includes a CSV download, which provides a list of all tweets with numbers for Faves, Retweets, and Replies.

Followers:

Followers is the second option, and includes some pretty cool stats about your followers. At the top of the page, there’s a graph showing your per-day follower count from day one of your Twitter account. Below that, you are given some interesting topical, location, and gender info, including:

Interests:

Most unique interests – shows the top five most unique interests of your followers. I’m assuming this comes from some data-mining of follower’s Twitter accounts. For my Twitter account, my followers most unique interests are:

  • 39% Biographies and memoirs
  • 11% job search
  • 9% Education news and general info
  • 7% freelance writing
  • 2% geneology (yes, that’s how they spelled it. Oops)

Top Interests:

The top ten interests of my followers, which include:

  • 72% politics and current events
  • 58% book news and general info
  • 56% business and news
  • Etc. Hover over any of the numbers in this section, and you can see a total number for that percentage.

Location:

This shows the top countries and states of my followers (USA, Kansas, New York, Illinois, Ohio, and Massachussets). Also a lot of people from Australia and Canada.

Top Cities:

In my case, they include: Topeka, Wichita, Sydney AU, Melbourne AU, and Perth AU. Alright – you Australians are awesome!

Gender:

45% male, 55% female.

And finally, a Your Followers also Follow list. My followers, unsurprisingly, also follow these Twitter accounts:

So that’s that! Twitter – thanks for the analytics! There’s some really good stuff here!

Library as Community Recharging Station

My library is thinking about recharging stations for mobile devices. So I’m looking into outlets with USB slots, special stands, etc.

How come? Because customers want to recharge. If you walk around our library, you’ll notice we have a lot of lamps by comfy chairs. Guess what? Those lamps, for the most part, will be unplugged. Because people are recharging their devices. So – we’ll probably be doing something to address that.

But.

That also made me think – why shouldn’t the library be the community’s recharging station? For more than just mobile devices? What would we need to become the community’s recharging station?

Here are some ideas:

  • Lots of outlets
  • Lots of USB plugins
  • Comfortable chairs that can be moved around
  • Electric car charging stations
  • Lots of windows in the building
  • Offer video games for more than just teens
  • Make the library a fun place instead of a quiet place
  • Offer classes related to recharging/de-stressing
  • Be positive. At the desk, in signage, in instructions.
  • Focus on do, not on don’t. Yes rather than no.
  • Help customers make things
  • If someone’s sleeping in the library … maybe don’t kick them out.
  • Offer exercise classes. You have the books and the videos … why not the actual class?

And of course, have lots of good books :-)

Thoughts? Comments? Do you think of your library as the community’s recharging station? If so, why? If not, why? I’d love to hear from you!

Pics by Emergency Brake and Viktor Hertz

Design for People

I’ve been doing a lot of reading on responsive design lately (because my library is headed towards that), and that made me think. When designing websites, we tend to design for devices. That’s what responsive design is all about – it’s coding in such a way that your website “responds” appropriately to different screen sizes (i.e., desktops, tablets, smartphones). We design for things: for a desktop; for a screen; for a browser; for a tablet or smartphone.

Nothing wrong with that – a modern website has to work on all those devices, right?

But I also think we need to shift our focus a bit, to where it really counts. And that focus is not on the screen.

We need to design for people.

What’s that change?

We still need to do all the usual stuff – i.e., use great css, work on making our websites responsive, think about screensizes, readability, contrasting colors, etc.

But let’s also focus on people:

  • Put content first.
  • Ask customers what content they want … and then create that content!
  • Answer the why, what, and who questions.
  • Provide next steps and calls to action on ALL content.
  • Make asking questions and getting responses easy and seamless.
  • This works for our physical and our digital branches.
  • What else? Add to my list in the comments…

Simply put – put people first.

pic by Nicola Albertini

What’s Missing?

Ever wanted to know what your customers think is missing from a service point in your library?

There’s an easy way to find out … just ask! Post something that asks “what’s missing?” and start gathering answers. For example:

  • Want to find out what’s missing on your public PCs? Tape a form to the table by each computer and ask for comments.
  • Have a teen room, and you want to find out what’s missing there? Put up a white board that asks “what’s missing?” (and be prepared for some snarky responses. They’re teens, after all).
  • Have a mobile website or app? Do what my library did. The last link on the main page of our mobile Boopsie app is “What’s Missing? Send us a Suggestion.” Clicking that link leads to an email form that gets sent to me. And believe me, people fill that out!
  • Ask through your library’s social media channels.

You can ask a similar “what’s missing” question on a website, in a room of the library, or even in the stacks. The point is this: if you want to make improvements in the library, you need to find out what’s missing … and fix that stuff.

Pic by crdotx

Seven Strategies for Growing Community on your Blog

I recently saw this post at problogger.net about strategies for growing community on your blog, and thought the suggestions were great. Here are the 7 strategies mentioned:

  1. Write in a conversational voice. I usually call this “talk like you type.”
  2. Invite interaction. That means you need to ask people what they think!
  3. Consider a dedicated community area. This can be accomplished by creating a forum or a Facebook Group, for example.
  4. Use interactive and accessible mediums. Blogs that allow comments, Google Plus hangouts, etc.
  5. Run projects and challenges. These are basically tricky ways to jumpstart conversations and interaction. Examples include a 31 Days to a better …” set of posts, or a Photo a Day meme.
  6. Real life events. talk about what’s actually happening in your community. Relate it back to your library.
  7. Put your readers in the spotlight. Use guest posts, link to them on social media discussions, comment on their blogs, etc.

I’m curious – anyone do any of these? Which ones are the most useful in your library or blog?

Pic by Chiot’s Run