Computers in Libraries 2007: Day 2: LibraryThing

Tim Spalding, LibraryThing

Showing LibraryThing – features, social aspects, etc

Showed a graphical timeline on what you’ve read (not yet released)

Regular people care about book data more than you would think

Claims his product is the only one that works with z39.50 and MARC

Showed a great example of tagging vs LoC subject headings. Used the book Neuromancer as an example – tagged cyberpunk… but that word isn’t mentioned in the usual LoC subject headings…

LibraryThing for Libraries:
added stuff – tags, other editions, etc – all LibraryThing data
(He used Seattle Public Library’s catalog as an example)
Find other books tagged a certain word, then shows all tags from that book and all related tags – great for browsing

Hmm… if you enable tagging just for a single library, and use only tags that that library’s customers entered… you’re not going to get great browsability

There needs to be an OCLC for user generated data

Computers in Libraries 2007: Day 2 – Comments in the Catalog: Community Interaction

Glenn Peterson, Hennepin County Library

Case Study

Comments are:
mini reviews
any title in the catalog
a “blog for every book” – cool way to think about it!

Gave brief history about their comments project:
started taking book reviews by kids and teens
then they thought – hey, adults might like to do this (not too successful)
mentioned that they custom-created this – Sirsi doesn’t support it

Gave a demo of it

It’s a mash-up
bibliographic info
enriched content
patron comments
audio reviews – podcasts can be added in – cool! Quick 2-3 minute booktalk
amazon reviews are pulled in
has an rss feed for each title

Uses Amazon’s API to pull in recent amazon reviews on books

They have More Titles About section

Has an RSS feed for all customer comments

How’s it going?
most heavily used feature on their site!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
Especially popular with teens
5700 comments, 3000 users over the first 11 months

Maintenance:
pre-screened for language – smart
the “naughty word filter” – it’s an automated script
Title comes up most often in the filter (because of “tit”le)
batched every four hours and sent as an email message – 6-7 web services staff get those
click a link to hide a comment – within the email – to catch bad stuff
They remove the vowels in bad words with a note that says “edited for publication”

Our to-do list:
ratings
avatars
user profiles
tag cloud

Related developments
WPopac
SOPAC
Millennium (from Innovative)
LibraryThing for Libraries

Kansas Tri-Conference 2007: Day 2 – Libraries, Vendors, and the Future of Search

Andrew Pace

Showed a timeline of library automation (that started on 1936!)

Where are we?

  • the rfp has not evolved
  • the traditional ILS system is a legacy system
  • new innovation requires new technology

Discussed the current state of the ILS

what ILS catalogs do well:

  • inventory control
  • known item searching

what ILS catalogs don’t do well:

  • any search other than known item
  • anything other than books and journals
  • logical groupings of results
  • faceted searching
  • relevance ranking
  • sideways searching (suggestions, expansion of searches and search targets)

NextGen library search tools: lots of them… including worldcat, clustered searching, endeca, open sources, etc…

a few words about nextgen and 2.0:

  • they are adjectives for libraries and systems
  • not our patrons – they are already there

To our customers, search looks like Google and iTunes and flickr

what is faceted navigation?

  • Sounds like boolean and limiting to me…
  • gave examples – narrow by category at amazon, clusty’s sidebar narrowing, etc

Needle Library, Haystack College is using ExLibris (look at it)

Existing catalogs are hard to use:

  • lots of topical searches and poor subject access
  • keyword doesn’t work well
  • relevance is really just system sort order in library catalogs
  • unforgiving on spelling errors or stemming
  • response time is bad

explained why NCSU wanted a new catalog…

showed a screencast of an NCSU catalog search

Most of their users are doing basic keyword searching – about 1/3 are choosing the refinements (mostly subject refinements)

usability testing:

  • relevance ranking is key
  • only 13% went to page two!
  • faceted navigation is intuitive
  • beware of library jargon
  • user behavior is influenced by previous experience

Interesting tidbits:

  • keyword searching up 230%
  • authority searching is down 45%

Future opportunities

  • integrate catalog with other tools through web services
  • enrich catalog with external web services – book jackets, etc
  • build cross application shopping cart functionality

Where are we headed?

  • interoperability – that’d be cool… right now, it’s the exception not the rule
  • web services
  • 3rd parties – will become a viable source for ILS type services
  • Re-integration (eventually)
  • continued mergers, market consolidation, etc
  • more vertical integration (portals, federated search, serials content management, etc)
  • more open source, local development, and 3rd party partnerships

“Open source is more like a free kitten, not like free beer.”

SirsiDynix is Building Rome

Update: Here’s a link to the official press release.

You might have seen some posts about Sirsi/Dynix here, here and here… well, they sent an email out to SirsiDynix customers – here’s the email (I’m assuming this will resemble the press release that’s supposed to be released later on today):

Dear valued SirsiDynix
customer,

 

Later today, SirsiDynix will make an
exciting announcement for both our company and the library market. Before the
announcement becomes public knowledge and a press release is issued, I wanted to
personally share now what the rest of the world will hear shortly – as well as
explain to you what it means for customers of SirsiDynix Horizon, Corinthian,
and Dynix Classic integrated library systems.

 

SirsiDynix will unveil that we are
blending the strengths and best features of Horizon/Corinthian, Unicorn, and
other solutions to create a new, versatile technology platform to serve
21st-century libraries and consortia. Code-named “Rome,” this
platform goes beyond the traditional integrated library system to encompass the
full range of technology building blocks for managing library operations and
resources, while providing meaningful user experiences to your information
consumers.

 

Rome is built on the architecture of the
industry-standard Unicorn Library Management System – with its record of
stability, quality, and performance – and will include an impressive set of new
solutions created as part of Horizon 8.0/Corinthian development. The first
release of Rome will be available in the fourth quarter of this year. The target
time for the second release is late 2008.

 

What does this mean to
Horizon/Corinthian and Dynix Classic customers?

 

There are several key points you
should know:

 

  • SirsiDynix will continue to maintain
    and support Horizon 7.3/7.4.
  • Horizon 8.0/Corinthian, which is
    already in use at a limited number of sites, will not be generally released.
    Horizon 8.1/Corinthian and Unicorn GL3.2 will not be released. Instead, the new
    functionality of both will be incorporated into Rome over time.
  • We will focus our
    research-and-development efforts on Rome. In doing so, we will be able to better
    deliver the capabilities expected in Horizon 8/Corinthian, but faster and on a
    more stable platform. As a result, Rome will be the platform for all SirsiDynix
    users in the future.

Here are the upgrade or migration
paths for customers planning to move to Horizon 7.3/7.4 or Horizon
8.0/Corinthian, or for those on the Dynix Classic legacy system:

 

  • Customers in the queue to implement
    Horizon 7.3/7.4 can choose to continue on this path. They do so with the
    understanding that their next upgrade will be to Rome and that additional
    training and other activities might be required for Rome.
  • As there will be no further
    implementations of Horizon 8.0/Corinthian, customers in the queue to implement
    Horizon 8.0/Corinthian can move to Horizon 7.3/7.4, if they are not already on
    that version.
  • The immediate Dynix Classic
    migration option is to move to Unicorn GL3.1, just as those sites would have
    migrated to Horizon 8.0/Corinthian. Otherwise, they can follow the migration
    path to Rome in the coming months. Migrating to Unicorn GL3.1 will later
    minimize additional training and upgrade activities required for moving to
    Rome.

The upcoming press release will
offer more information about the major features and benefits of Rome. I cannot
stress enough that this new technology platform will provide the “best of both
worlds” – the stability you require and the features you need.

 

As always, if you have questions
about your particular case, please contact your SirsiDynix account
representative.

 

Regards,

 

Talin Bingham

Chief Technology Officer

SirsiDynix

SirsiDynix is Building Rome

You might have seen some posts about Sirsi/Dynix here, here and here… well, they sent an email out to SirsiDynix customers – here’s the email (I’m assuming this will resemble the press release that’s supposed to be released later on today):

Dear valued SirsiDynix
customer,

 

Later today, SirsiDynix will make an
exciting announcement for both our company and the library market. Before the
announcement becomes public knowledge and a press release is issued, I wanted to
personally share now what the rest of the world will hear shortly – as well as
explain to you what it means for customers of SirsiDynix Horizon, Corinthian,
and Dynix Classic integrated library systems.

 

SirsiDynix will unveil that we are
blending the strengths and best features of Horizon/Corinthian, Unicorn, and
other solutions to create a new, versatile technology platform to serve
21st-century libraries and consortia. Code-named “Rome,” this
platform goes beyond the traditional integrated library system to encompass the
full range of technology building blocks for managing library operations and
resources, while providing meaningful user experiences to your information
consumers.

 

Rome is built on the architecture of the
industry-standard Unicorn Library Management System – with its record of
stability, quality, and performance – and will include an impressive set of new
solutions created as part of Horizon 8.0/Corinthian development. The first
release of Rome will be available in the fourth quarter of this year. The target
time for the second release is late 2008.

 

What does this mean to
Horizon/Corinthian and Dynix Classic customers?

 

There are several key points you
should know:

 

  • SirsiDynix will continue to maintain
    and support Horizon 7.3/7.4.
  • Horizon 8.0/Corinthian, which is
    already in use at a limited number of sites, will not be generally released.
    Horizon 8.1/Corinthian and Unicorn GL3.2 will not be released. Instead, the new
    functionality of both will be incorporated into Rome over time.
  • We will focus our
    research-and-development efforts on Rome. In doing so, we will be able to better
    deliver the capabilities expected in Horizon 8/Corinthian, but faster and on a
    more stable platform. As a result, Rome will be the platform for all SirsiDynix
    users in the future.

Here are the upgrade or migration
paths for customers planning to move to Horizon 7.3/7.4 or Horizon
8.0/Corinthian, or for those on the Dynix Classic legacy system:

 

  • Customers in the queue to implement
    Horizon 7.3/7.4 can choose to continue on this path. They do so with the
    understanding that their next upgrade will be to Rome and that additional
    training and other activities might be required for Rome.
  • As there will be no further
    implementations of Horizon 8.0/Corinthian, customers in the queue to implement
    Horizon 8.0/Corinthian can move to Horizon 7.3/7.4, if they are not already on
    that version.
  • The immediate Dynix Classic
    migration option is to move to Unicorn GL3.1, just as those sites would have
    migrated to Horizon 8.0/Corinthian. Otherwise, they can follow the migration
    path to Rome in the coming months. Migrating to Unicorn GL3.1 will later
    minimize additional training and upgrade activities required for moving to
    Rome.

The upcoming press release will
offer more information about the major features and benefits of Rome. I cannot
stress enough that this new technology platform will provide the “best of both
worlds” – the stability you require and the features you need.

 

As always, if you have questions
about your particular case, please contact your SirsiDynix account
representative.

 

Regards,

 

Talin Bingham

Chief Technology Officer

SirsiDynix